In the matter of Patel v. Duncan, C.A. No. 2020-0418-MTZ (Del. Ch. May 17, 2020), the Court of Chancery addressed whether a party was indispensable for purposes of Court of Chancery Rule 19(a), and held that the case would not proceed until those parties were added. Anyone needing to know the latest iteration of Delaware

The Delaware Court of Chancery recently explained the public policy involved, and the applicable criteria used by the court, to determine if “claims-splitting” should require the stay or dismissal of one lawsuit when the same parties are pursuing another lawsuit in another forum based on the same operative facts. In Goureau v. Lemonis, C.A.

This post was prepared by Frank Reynolds, who has been following Delaware corporate law, and writing about it for various legal publications, for over 30 years.

The Chancery Court recently green-lighted key parts of an investment company’s suit against officers and owners who allegedly inflated their I.T. and data center services provider’s worth, finding the

This post is an aggregation of miscellaneous worthwhile Delaware corporate litigation developments that was easier to present as one post instead of multiple smaller posts:

1.     Case Law Regarding Importance of Formalities to Modify Pretrial Scheduling Orders:

A Delaware Supreme Court opinion of several years ago, highlighted on these pages, emphasized that informal extensions

An associate in the Delaware office of Eckert Seamans prepared this overview.

The Court of Chancery opinion in Horne v. OptimisCorp, C.A. No. 12268-VCS (Del. Ch. Mar. 3, 2017) explores Delaware’s indemnification provisions.

Background:  Plaintiff William Horne (“Horne”) brought an action for indemnification for fees and expenses against OptimisCorp (the “Company”).  Horne’s fees

The Delaware Association of Second Amendment Lawyers will present its Third Annual Delaware Firearms Law Seminar on October 6, 2016 at 8:30 a.m. in Wilmington, Delaware, at the Doubletree Hotel. The foregoing hyperlink has more details, but in addition to nationally-recognized constitutional law scholars, two members of the Delaware judiciary will be making a presentation

Generally, a successful claim for advancement of legal fees for a former director or officer entitles the prevailing party to “fees on fees” incurred for obtaining the favorable ruling. A recent ruling from the newest member of the Delaware Court of Chancery explains the limitations or the contours of that general rule. In Wong v.