A recent Delaware Supreme Court opinion addressed the independence and disinterestedness of corporate directors in the context of adequately pleading pre-suit demand futility as a prerequisite for pursuing a derivative claim. In Marchand v. Barnhill (Del. June 19, 2019), the court reversed the Court of Chancery’s dismissal of the case for failure to establish demand futility. This issue is one of the most nuanced and challenging in Delaware corporate litigation (evidenced by the disagreement on the outcome among the jurists deciding this case.)

Instead of my typical highlights of the case, I will share the scholarly insights of Prof. Ann Lipton as excerpted by Prof. Stephen Bainbridge on his blog, as follows:

Chief Justice Leo Strine rehabilitates his Oracle decision

Ann Lipton analyzes the recent Delaware Supreme Court decision in Marchand v. Barnhill, “which is notable for two reasons.  First, it furthers the Court’s project of reinvigorating director independence standards, and second, it is one of the very few decisions to find that the plaintiffs properly pled a claim for Caremark violations.”

As to the former, she observes that:

Starting with the issue of director independence, as Delaware-watchers are well-aware, in the past few years, the law has undergone something of a revolution.  Once upon a time, only clear financial ties or the equivalent of blood relations would be sufficient to show that one director lacked independence from another, but more recently, Delaware has begun to recognize how less concrete social and business ties, traveling in similar circles, ongoing professional and personal contacts, and so forth, can collectively create feelings of obligation that prevent one director from making an objective decision about whether to sue another.

Thus, in Marchand, the Court held that a particular director was likely biased in favor of Kruse because the Kruse family – not Paul Kruse personally – had mentored him throughout his business career, going so far as to make a sizeable donation to a local college that somehow ended up with the director in question getting a facility named after him.  Significantly, the Court emphasized that “independence” may vary depending on the type of decision at issue – directors may be willing to vote against close friends on some matters, but that’s a far cry from being willing to sue the friend for breach of duty, and judges need to be sensitive to the difference.

This entire line of caselaw might be described as Strine’s revenge: it’s a direction he recommended with In re Oracle Corp. Derivative Litig., 824 A.2d 917 (Del. Ch. 2003) when he was on the Chancery court, and that the Delaware Supreme Court rejected in Beam v. Stewart, 845 A.2d 1040 (Del. 2004).  Now in the Chief Justice spot, Strine has apparently persuaded his colleagues as to the correctness of his views and is moving full steam ahead, going so far in Marchand as to cite his Oracle decision, thus retroactively making it authoritative.