Photo of Francis Pileggi

This post was prepared by Frank Reynolds, who has been following Delaware corporate law, and writing about it for various legal publications, for over 30 years.

Corporate lawyers have a unique opportunity to influence American companies to benefit by practicing the ethical standards their mission statements and codes of conduct espouse, a Villanova Law School

In my latest article for the current issue of The Delaware Business Court Insider, I provide highlights of a recent Chancery decision that involved virtually no damages for non-compliance with a confidentiality provision. Courtesy of that publication, the article is reprinted below.

A recent noteworthy Delaware Court of Chancery decision should be kept handy by

The 36th Annual Francis G. Pileggi Distinguished Lecture in Law (named after the father of this blog’s primary author), is presented by The Delaware Journal of Corporate Law of Widener University’s Delaware Law School

This year’s topic is

Business Ethics: What Everyone Needs to Know

Professor J. S. Nelson
Visiting Associate Professor at the

A recent decision of the Delaware Court of Chancery acknowledged longstanding precedent which prohibits a state court from enjoining proceedings in a federal court.  In Schwartz v. Cognizant Technologies Solutions Corporation, C.A. No. 2021-0634-LWW (Del. Ch. March 25, 2022), the court recited several well­-established principles barring it from issuing an injunction to interfere with

This post was prepared by Frank Reynolds, who has been following Delaware corporate law, and writing about it for various legal publications, for over 30 years.

Vice Chancellor Sam Glasscock recently declined to certify a class action challenge to an allegedly unfair side deal in Straight Path Communications Inc.’s 2018 sale to Verizon Communications Inc.

In a short letter ruling, with widespread applicability, the Court of Chancery explained in Paul Elton, LLC v. Rommel Delaware, LLC, et al., C.A. No. 2019-0750-KSJM (Del. Ch. Mar. 16, 2022), that typical indemnification provisions ordinarily:

“are presumed not to require reimbursement for attorneys’ fees incurred as a result of substantive litigation between the