Photo of Francis Pileggi

This post was prepared by Frank Reynolds, who has been following Delaware law and writing about it in various publications for over 30 years.

Delaware’s Court of Chancery recently dismissed a shareholder challenge to The Trade Desk Inc. (TTD) charter amendment that extended the advertising software company’s dual stock class structure and its CEO’s control,

The Delaware Supreme Court recently provided guidance to corporate litigators regarding the nuances of DGCL Section 220, which most readers recognize as the statute that allows stockholders to demand certain corporate records if the prerequisites in the statute–and those imposed by countless court decisions–have been satisfied. In NVIDIA Corp. v. City of Westmoreland Police and

The Delaware Court of Chancery recently denied a frivolous pro se motion to recuse, and the introduction to the reasons why the motion was denied might be used as an eloquent preface for a rebuttal to almost any frivolous accusation that a recipient may be reluctant to dignify with a response.

In Wollner v. PearPop

This post was prepared by Frank Reynolds, who has been following Delaware law and writing about it in various publications for over 30 years.

The Chancery Court recently ruled Carvana Company’s controlling family must prove their  stock deal was entirely fair to the on-line used car dealer’s investors after finding the long, dependent business relationships


Delaware’s favorite corporate law scholar, the prolific and widely-quoted Professor Stephen Bainbridge, writes that the effort afoot to promulgate a Restatement of the Law of Corporate Governance is unnecessary at best, citing to extensive scholarship–including his own–as well as extensive case law to support his position opposing the titular topic.

The good professor makes his

This post was prepared by Frank Reynolds, who has been following Delaware law and writing about it in various publications for over 30 years.

The Chancery Court recently required Authentix Holdings L.P. directors who were also employees of the brand protection services company’s controlling stockholder, private equity giant The Carlyle Group, to show that Authentix’s